Thanks for visiting. Enjoy this FREE BOOK on Communication

Ep. 245 Rick Answers Your Eclectic Facebook Questions

Ep. 245 Rick Answers Your Many and Eclectic Facebook Questions

Show’s Main Idea – Lots of questions from our community. Rick tackles some of your most pressing matters in this podcast. For example, how to make a living as a Christian counselor? How do you respond to a person who won’t forgive you? What happens when you conflate being whole and having broken relationships? There are more.

Listen to the podcast

Our podcasts are on iTunes, Google Play, SoundCloud, TuneIn, or Stitcher. If you want to comment on this content, go here.

Show Notes

Helpful Resources

Hi Rick. I enjoy all your articles. Do you write Christian articles for a living? Where do you find the time? –Dan

I just listened to your podcast about Beth Moore! Very good and very true! Thanks for all your hard work. –Kristine

Do you have any writings about domestic violence? –Bethesda

I just got connected to Rick Thomas today. And I listened to his podcast on “never saying you are sorry for an apology.” I really liked the biblical teaching during this session. I agree with what I heard, and I learned today. I do have a question, though. As the offender, we are to confess and ask God and the person we offended to forgive us. We know that if we truly repent in our hearts, God will forgive us, and this is part of the redemption process. What if the person you ask for forgiveness is unwilling to forgive you. The person is sincere in their request. How do they become whole again, knowing that this person may not forgive them? This was not discussed in the podcast, and I looked on the website and did not see a section where I could review this information. I understand some people may not be willing to forgive, which is their choice, and that is a freedom that everyone has. And I know I need to deal with this when it might happen. How does one graciously move forward and feel good about the Christian steps they took to truly right the wrong that they personally caused. They are remorseful, repentant, and have asked to be forgiven with a clear understanding that they sinned and were not right in the eyes of God or the persons they wronged. Should being forgiven by God be enough, at least for now, in order to allow that other person to deal with the sin in his or her own time? I know that there can be some repercussions, and the person you are asking to forgive you might hold this against you, and yet we need to present a good spirit and a loving manner on a day-to-day basis. I am looking for some suggestions to keep the proper godly perspective to move forward. –Bob (Read our articles on forgiveness.)

He provides sound advice backed by biblical counsel for “real” life situations. Rick Thomas’ podcast and articles help expand our thoughts in varying difficult issues. Listening to the array of podcasts that we may not think we need always seems to provide something of relevance to add to our “life toolbox” as we grow in God. When reading articles, he also adds additional articles that may also be helpful. I recommend him to everyone. –Kim

Can your articles be printed? –Ellen

Is there an age limit to the Mastermind Program? –Jenny

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Filed Under: